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AQE Event 2013 PRESS PACK

ABB to highlight emissions technology and know-how at AQE 2013

ABB to showcase gas analysis equipment and expertise at leading environmental technology show

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ABB will be exhibiting its latest range of air and gas analysers at the Air Quality and Emissions (AQE) Show at the Telford International Centre (13-14th March 2013). Stands 47 and 48 will feature a comprehensive selection of ABB equipment utilising a variety of measurement techniques, including laser, zirconia and FT-IR spectrometry.

Products on the stands will include the LS25 laser gas analyser. Enabling in-situ monitoring in stacks, pipes, process chambers and other similar applications, the LS25 uses tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) to measure concentrations of various gases including oxygen and ammonia in gas streams. Offering a very fast response time, the LS25 is especially suited to applications with fast changing conditions such as municipal waste incineration where the composition of gases may be subject to rapid changes.

Other equipment on display will be ABB's new Endura AZ10 zirconia oxygen and StackFlowMaster instruments.

The AZ10 is a compact combustion gas analyser for use in safe areas, coupling ABB's proven zirconia oxygen sensing and transmitter technology. Aimed at safe area combustion processes, the AZ10 uses ABB's common AZ transmitter platform, making it a low cost solution ideal for OEMs.

The StackFlowMaster is an in-situ device for measuring flows in stacks up to eight metres in diameter. The StackFlowMaster Manual version is for use in applications with relatively clean gases such as gas fired combustion processes. The StackFlowMaster Automatic features a purging and auto/span zero capability, making it suitable for applications with dust-laden gas streams.

Both versions of the StackFlowMaster work with continuous emissions monitoring analysers to calculate the emissions flow in mass or corrected volume units of measurement.

As well as being MCERTified and fully compliant with EN 15267-3, the StackFlowMaster is also fully QAL3 compliant, making it ideal for use by plants operating under an Environment Agency permit.
Using the StackFlowMaster's zero and span functions, operators and test laboratories can perform regular tests to ascertain the performance of the analyser during normal operation.

Joining these products will be examples from ABB's EasyLine EL3000 range of photometers for gas analysis. Based on ABB's MCERTS approved proven and reliable extractive continuous gas analysis technology, the EL range is available in both infrared (IR) and ultra-violet (UV) photometers, with a choice of sensing and analyser options including electrochemical, paramagnetic, thermal conductivity and trace oxygen.

Key features of the EL3000 range include automatic calibration and extensive self-diagnosis functions, including error messages in multiple languages, together with a simple menu-driven operator interface.

The EL3000 range is suitable for a wide variety of applications, including combustion processes, landfill gas monitoring, ambient air monitoring and emissions measurement in line with the Large Combustion Plants Directive 2001/80/EC.

Also on show will be ABB's ACF-NT analysers. Future developments will include the ability to measure additional combustion off gases, as well as fully automated calibration, reducing the time and cost associated with calibration and maximising the uptime of the analyser.
The ACF will be one of the products incorporated within the main demonstration area of AQE 2013, which will feature a 6 metre high, 1.5 metre diameter chimney showing how products from ABB and other suppliers are typically deployed in actual applications. ABB's section of the demonstration will see the ACF analyser being connected to a dummy probe inserted into the chimney to show visitors how the system works.

As well as showcasing its products at the exhibition, ABB will also be hosting two workshops covering key issues affecting the deployment of gas analysers in industrial applications.

The first workshop, hosted by ABB's UK Analytical Sales Specialist, Steve Donnelly, is entitled ‘Improve your OMA score, and save money' (Wednesday 13th March, Room 4, 11.00-11.30). The workshop will explain how using ABB's next generation FTIR CEMS can help operators to maximise their OMA score and reduce capital and lifetime costs by having the best available technology and service and support in place.

The second workshop, also hosted by Steve Donnelly, will be titled ‘ABB StackFlowMaster: integrating flow measurement into ABB CEMS". Taking place on Thursday 14th March, the workshop will explain how flow data from ABB's StackFlowMaster can be integrated into Continuous Emissions Monitoring systems to provide a comprehensive picture of both the quantity and quality of gas streams.

"Ongoing developments in environmental legislation, particularly on the emissions front, mean that it is critical for operators of industrial plant in particular to keep abreast of the latest developments in both the regulations and the technology available to help address them," says Steve Donnelly. "By being at the show, we hope to educate visitors about what's available and show them how it can be integrated into their operations."

For more information, email moreinstrumentation@gb.abb.com or call 0870 600 6122 ref. ‘AQE 2013'.

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Enviropower maintains constant power output with ABB gas analyzers

Highly reliable ABB gas analyzers that have not suffered a single time loss failure in five years have allowed a waste to energy plant in West Sussex to achieve its target of 85% percent operating time.

The plant, owned and operated by Enviropower in Lancing, has a 5MWe capacity, burning around 60,000 tonnes a year of biomass fuel derived from construction and demolition waste.

Built in 2008, the plant uses an ABB ACF-NT multi-gas analyzer on each of its two combustion lines. Used to measure all the gas emissions from the plant, their data is sent to an emission reporting system, allowing Enviropower to prove that it is meeting the requirements of the Environment Agency.

Working with its construction company for the project, Enviropower chose ABB as the analyzer vendor because of the high reliability of its products and its demonstrated ability to integrate complete solutions.

Steve Donnelly, Analytical Sales Specialist for ABB, says: "ABB was chosen not only because of the quality of its products, but also for its ability to integrate these products with third party systems as part of a complete solution. Another attraction for Enviropower was ABB's ability to install and service the solution."

"We were looking for a big name supplier," says the plant's General Manager, Mick Adams. "We wanted an organization that had experience in the industry and which could offer the kind of service support we needed.

"Because our operation is permit based, we have to meet certain criteria. One of these is the use of equipment that complies with the requirements of the Environment Agency's MCERTS standards. Our permit specifies a minimum oxygen content of 11%, which will shortly reduce to six percent, so it was important that the analyzers had the flexibility to adapt to changing regulations.

"There were a number of large companies that could meet our needs but none we felt so comfortable with. All the people we met at ABB were very helpful and easy to deal with."

Reliability of the analyzers was also key to the selection of ABB for Enviropower, as was excellent service. Says Adams: "If the analyzers are not online we cannot produce power, so it was vital that reliability was high and that servicing was kept to a minimum."

The ABB analyzers need servicing only once every six months. "ABB provides us with very good support," says Adams. "We are very happy with the service regime which is very well organized and gives 24/7 support through a dedicated helpline."

ABB also liaised closely with the Environment Agency to ensure the solution provided to Enviropower would meet the company's needs. "We conducted a pre-design consultancy phase to ensure that the analyzer solution would fit onto the site, could connect to the plant control systems and would be maintainable in-situ," says Donnelly. "Every analyzer solution we produce is designed to the specific requirements of a particular site and includes a support package."

The ABB ACF-NT emission and process monitoring analyzer offers continuous, quantitative and selective measurement of numerous gasses, including HCl, HF, H2O, CO, CO2, SO2, NOX, NH3, N2O, O2, TOC and NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbons). The product achieves high stability, accuracy and reliability through proven FTIR technology.
It also offers integration and display of signals from other instruments, including data on dust, mercury, flow, pressure and temperature.
ABB's support extended to helping complete the project when the original contractor ran into difficulties towards the end of the contract. "ABB stepped up to ensure that the contract could be completed and took on the financial burden of seeing the project through to completion," says Adams.

"ABB has done its very best to support us and has looked after our interests very well."

 

 

 

One Directive to rule them all...


The countdown has begun for UK regulators, who have until January 2013 to implement Europe's new Directive on Industrial Emissions (IED) in British law. Steve Donnelly, ABB Analytical Sales Specialist, discusses how the regulatory regime is changing.

Opponents of so-called red tape will welcome the IED with open arms. It replaces seven older directives in one go, significantly simplifying the legislative regime governing emission controls across Europe.

The new directive (2010/75/EU) came into force on 6 January 2011, and must be transposed into UK law by 6 January 2013. The expected route for this will be via changes in the Environmental Permitting Regulations (EPR).

New industrial operations covered by the directive must comply with the IED following next year's January deadline, while almost all installations that pre-date January 2013 will have an extra year to fall in line. The directive makes an exception for large combustion plants, which have until 2016. There's also an extension till 6 July 2015 for industrial activities in sectors that weren't previously covered by the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive (IPPCD).

As well as the IPPCD, the IED supersedes the Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD), the Waste Incineration Directive (WID); the Solvent Emissions Directive (SED); and three existing directives on titanium dioxide, governing disposal (78/176/EEC), monitoring and surveillance (82/883/EEC) and programmes for the reduction of pollution (92/112/EEC).

Between them, these component directives apply to some 10,200 industrial installations in England and Wales, ranging from power stations to intensive poultry farms and from waste incinerators to dry cleaners.

As a reworking, or "recast", of the previous legislation, large sections of the IED are completely unchanged from the component directives or adapted from them without substantial changes. But other sections will potentially have a real impact on the way plant operators run their activities.
Key areas of change

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has identified several key areas that are most likely to have an impact.

First there are changes to the minimum requirements in respect of emission limit values (ELVs) applied to large combustion plants. This will be especially significant in the electricity supply industry.

Then there are some sites that will fall under the IED regime for the first time, including more waste treatment activities, wood preservation activities and independently operated wastewater treatment works that serve industrial activities that are already subject to the IPPC Directive. There is also some clarification about how to apply the regulations to installations producing foodstuffs from a mixture of animal and vegetable materials.

The chief concept underpinning pollution prevention under both IPPC and the new regime is the use of best available techniques (BAT). It's for the regulator - whether that's the Environment Agency or the local authority - to determine BAT for each installation, but the European Commission has provided some support in the form of a series of reference documents on BAT (known at BREFs). The 29 BREFs each explore BAT for a particular activity, whether it's livestock husbandry, large combustion or speciality chemicals production.

BREFs are drawn up based on information gathered from real-life operators across the EU, so they closely reflect best practice and should be technically and economically sensible across each sector. In fact, DEFRA likens this approach to a form of self-regulation.

Responsible behaviour

This idea of potential polluters taking responsibility for monitoring and managing their own emissions is also central to the way the Environment Agency currently promotes effective monitoring by operators, and this looks set to continue under the revised EPR.

Operator Monitoring Assessment (OMA) programme is a key part of ensuring that industrial operators correctly monitor their effluent discharges to the environment, both to air and, more recently, water courses.

OMA is one of the main pillars of the EPR and was introduced to strengthen the Environment Agency's auditing of operators' self-monitoring arrangements. Underpinning this is the idea that both industrial companies and water utilities will be partly responsible for monitoring their own discharges under the Operator Self-Monitoring (OSM) scheme.

Under OSM all effluent must be measured, recorded and maintained within each company's site permit limits, bringing the ownership of monitoring and compliance back to industrial operators. Companies wishing to achieve the maximum score for their assessments will have to use MCERTified equipment from the Agency's approved list or the BAT in order to score maximum points.

Having passed the Environment Agency's testing requirements, MCERTified products and BAT are typically one and the same thing, increasing the likelihood of achieving maximum points and being readily accepted by the Environment Agency's inspectors.

OMA initially applied only to emissions to air from industrial operations, but in May 2009, OMA Version 3 extended the requirement for OMA to include discharges to sewers and water. At the time, the Environment Agency maintained that responsible companies facing OMA for the first time should not suffer from onerous extra costs and can even save money by reducing their waste and optimising their use of resources. After all, poor waste management often leaves companies losing energy, product and raw materials that might otherwise be recovered and re-used.

There's no reason why companies falling under the EPR for the first time with the new Directive shouldn't enjoy the same benefits.

In addition, OMA results are publicly available, so a high score is valuable social capital in a marketplace increasingly concerned about whether organisations are operating ethically and sustainably and are a good neighbour to local businesses and residents. So the question many organisations are asking is what they need to do to secure a high OMA score?

Some elements include critical requirements, without which it is impossible to get the highest score, however assiduously an operator applies the remaining measures. One area where there is a definite hardening of policy is in the requirement to use monitoring equipment that has been certified as officially fit for purpose. This is managed under the MCERTS scheme.
MCERTS relies on the independent testing centre SIRA to test and certify measurement and monitoring equipment for use with environmentally sensitive emissions, including all the waste streams specified in an EPR application. Like OMA, MCERTS started out on the air emissions side, so there is now a good choice of MCERTified equipment for every aspect of air emissions covered by the EPR. As long as existing equipment meets the required measurement standards it need not be replaced immediately. However, any new equipment must be purchased from the MCERTS list.

These lists may need to be revised where the IED is introducing significant changes. Take the revised ELVs for large combustion plant, for example. The permitted levels for some pollutants - most notably NOx - have been halved, which will leave some of the instruments on the previous MCERTs list struggling to meet the required measurement standard.

If in doubt about the impending changes, talk to a reputable instrumentation supplier to check that their current MCERTified equipment will still be considered fit for purpose under the new regime.
For more information about how ABB can help you to meet the Industrial Emissions Directive, call 0870 600 6122 or email moreinstrumentation@gb.abb.com ref. ‘IED'.

 

Time to assess whether you comply with tighter EA self-monitoring standards

Tony Hoyle, General Manager for ABB's UK Measurement Products business, explains how industrial companies can comply with the Environment Agency's tighter standards for self-monitoring
The Environment Agency's (EA) Operator Monitoring Assessment (OMA) programme is a key part of ensuring that industrial operators correctly monitor their effluent discharges to the environment, both to air and, more recently, water courses.


OMA is one of the main pillars of the Environmental Permitting Regulations (EPR) and was introduced to strengthen the EA's auditing of operators' self-monitoring arrangements. Underpinning this is the idea that both industrial companies and water utilities will be partly responsible for monitoring their own discharges under the Operator Self Monitoring (OSM) scheme.

Under OSM all effluent must be measured, recorded and maintained within each company's site permit limits, bringing the ownership of monitoring and compliance back to industrial operators. Companies wishing to achieve the maximum score for their assessments will have to use MCERTified equipment or the Best Available Technique (BAT) to be able to score maximum points.
Having passed the Environment Agency's testing requirements, MCERTified products will often constitute BAT, increasing the likelihood of achieving maximum points and being readily accepted by the Environment Agency's inspectors.

OMA initially applied only to emissions to air from industrial operations, but in May 2009, OMA Version 3 extended the requirement for OMA to include discharges to sewers and water. It dividesthe requirements of effective monitoring up into four sections, namely:

• Management, training and personnel competence
• Fitness for purpose of monitoring methods
• Maintenance and calibration of monitoring equipment
• Quality assurance of monitoring


Each of the four main sections is further divided into five or six elements to form a logical framework for assessing the effectiveness of the overall monitoring regime. Although operators need to address each element, the EA identifies three of them as fundamental. Getting a low score in any of these indicates critical flaws in the monitoring regime and an urgent need for improvements. The three fundamental elements are:

• Sampling facilities (section 2A)
• Measurement techniques (section 2B)
• Acceptability of calibration methods (section 3F)

In scoring the individual elements, a score of 1 is poor, 3 is acceptable and 5 is excellent. The scores for each element in a section are added together and an overall percentage of the possible high score is calculated for each section. The overall OMA score is then calculated as the mean of the section scores. The chief aim is to help operators to identify and prioritise any necessary improvements, so there is no absolute pass or fail score.

The EA maintains that responsible companies facing OMA for the first time should not suffer from onerous extra costs and can even save money by reducing their waste and optimising their use of resources. After all, poor waste management often leaves companies losing product and raw materials that might otherwise be recovered and re-used. In addition, OMA results are publicly available, so a high score is valuable social capital in a marketplace increasingly concerned about whether organisations are operating ethically and sustainably and are a good neighbour to local businesses and residents.

So the question many organisations are asking is what they need to do to secure a high OMA score. Some elements include critical requirements, without which it is impossible to get the highest score, however assiduously an operator applies the remaining measures. One area where there is a definite hardening of policy is in the requirement to use monitoring equipment that has been certified as officially fit for purpose. This is managed under the MCERTS scheme.

MCERTS relies on the independent testing centre SIRA to test and certify measurement and monitoring equipment for use with environmentally sensitive emissions, including all the waste streams specified in an EPR application. Like OMA, MCERTS started out on the air emissions side, so there is now a good choice of MCERTified equipment for every aspect of air emissions covered by the EPR. As long as existing equipment meets the required measurement standards it need not be replaced immediately. However, any new equipment must be purchased from the MCERTS list.

The regime is several years behind on the water side, where many equipment suppliers are still working with SIRA to get their instruments certified. But more instruments are being added to the list all the time. This fast-changing situation means that operators should check whether MCERTified equipment is available as and when they need to install new instrumentation for monitoring their aqueous effluent. If it is, they should use it. The current list is available on the SIRA Web site.

Of course, winning a high OMA score is about much more than shipping in the right kit. It also requires the expertise to ensure that the equipment is installed, operated and maintained properly so that it delivers reliable service between inspections. For example, ABB may be best known as an equipment supplier, but one of the related areas that has been keeping ABB busy is providing consulting services to site operators who are applying for EPR permits. This might be an initial application or it might be, say, the result of a site extension or an improvement notice from the EA.This activity used to be confined mainly to helping operators in the process industries, but the arrival of the utility companies in the OMA arena is making life busier than ever for consultants.

Even where operators consider it unnecessary to bring in the consultants, reputable equipment suppliers should offer a good level of technical support through their product service teams. They might help with commissioning and installation, as well as calibration and verification, for instance. This prevents some of the common problems that might otherwise affect monitoring performance, such as installing flowmeters without the correct upstream and downstream straight pipe runs or without the proper earthing. In the case of ABB, for example, opting for ABB engineers to commission instrumentation may also result in a one-year warranty extension offer for some products, in addition to the peace of mind of having a manufacturer's back-up and support.

The gap between OMA inspections can be up to four years, but the EA expects that operators demonstrate that standards have been maintained in the mean time. Operators should have detailed maintenance and calibration programmes in place and be able to demonstrate that equipment is reliable and available throughout. For instance, some continuous monitoring systems do not require frequent calibration checks, but operators should adhere to the manufacturer's guidelines if they want a good score. This is another area where the equipment manufacturer can really help. ABB offers a five-year contract to provide an annual electronic verification of its electromagnetic flow meters, for instance.

In short, there's plenty of advice and support out there for companies that are worried about facing OMA for the first time. The EA, consultants and equipment suppliers are all ready to help. What's more, companies that span both sewage and water treatment should consider whether the potential benefits of a consistent approach to monitoring mean that they'd be better off bringing all their operations under a similar regime sooner rather than later. After all, it seems likely that they'll soon be forced to introduce OMA across the board in any case.

ABB has released a comprehensive new guide to the Environmental Permitting Regulations (EPR) and MCERTS, the Monitoring Certification Scheme of the Environment Agency (EA). Entitled MCERTS and EPR - a guide to environmental EPR legislation and monitoring systems and services, the guide is a useful point of reference for anyone responsible for the monitoring of emissions to air or water at an EPR regulated site.

For more about ABB's offering for MCERTS applications or to obtain a copy of ABB's new guide, email moreinstrumentation@gb.abb.com or call 0870 600 6122 ref. ‘MCERTS' or ‘MCERTS guide'.

 

 

ABB launches new guide to combustion optimisation

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ABB Measurement Products has published a new beginner's guide to combustion, providing a step-by-step process in achieving optimum combustion efficiency for any application using a combustion plant.

Poor control of the combustion process can lead to damage of a plant, such as soot formation or flue duct corrosion. If left unresolved, these can result in increasing maintenance expenditure and a reduction in the plant life cycle. Combustion optimisation can help operators improve process efficiency, reduce environmental impact and maintenance requirements

Available free on request, the guide covers the key parameters that affect combustion performance, such as fuel flow rate, moisture content and composition; temperature; and pressure. It explains the importance of oxygen measurement in combustion and how this can be used to optimize the air/fuel ratio to reduce harmful emissions and improve efficiency.

The guide also highlights how the latest generation of MCERTified Zirconia oxygen sensors (ATEX/ IECEx) can be deployed to measure oxygen concentration, together with the advantages of using in-situ analysers over portable devices. Potential pitfalls such as partial pressure effects and errors caused by combustibles in flue gases are explained thoroughly with calculation examples and simplified equations.

Written by ABB experts, the combustion optimisation beginner's guide is aimed at anyone looking to improve the efficiency of their combustion plant.

Copies of the guide are available in PDF format, on request. For your copy please email moreinstrumentation@gb.abb.com or phone 0870 600 6122 ref: ‘combustion'.

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